Author Topic: N2 in tyres  (Read 781 times)

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Offlineterry

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    N2 in tyres
    « on: 2013-06-01 09:15:45 »
    Does anyone know if using N2 in tyres has an adverse effect on the pressure sensors with regards to accuracy and/or damage?
    Past: Triumh Rocket tourer 2300. K1600 GTL blue. Present: Honda Pan European ST1300, K1600 GTL silver.

    OfflineJarse

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      Re: N2 in tyres
      « Reply #1 on: 2013-06-01 10:06:33 »
      Considering air is almost 80% N2, and N2 is an inert gas - no :)
      Nine out of five pilots are lysdexic!

      OfflineGargy

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        Re: N2 in tyres
        « Reply #2 on: 2013-06-01 20:07:57 »
        I have a bottle of pure Nitrogen in my workshop, which was used for my trackday bike a few years ago.


        To be honest, it made no difference at all. Racers use it when they don't want pressures to change with heat as much as it does with normal air.


        If 1/2 to 1 or 2 psi make a difference to your riding, then you need it, otherwise it's just a gimmick ........... Imho.
        R.I.P. Marco Simoncelli.

        Offlineterry

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          Re: N2 in tyres
          « Reply #3 on: 2013-06-03 13:49:50 »
          Thanks for your responses but I didn't actually ask if it made a difference to the ride or to the tyres but if it had an adverse effect on the pressure sensors in the wheels.

          I have subsequently asked this of a BMW dealership and the official answer is "We don't know".
          Past: Triumh Rocket tourer 2300. K1600 GTL blue. Present: Honda Pan European ST1300, K1600 GTL silver.

          OfflineGargy

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            Re: N2 in tyres
            « Reply #4 on: 2013-06-04 00:01:43 »
            Note to self..... 'Read the post your answering'


            Not sure about that, but I do know that Nitrogen does affect certain rubber compounds, as we use a nitrogen specific gasket in bottled gas nitrogen lines for laboratories.


            Personally, not knowing what the materials are in the sensors, I wouldn't use it.
            R.I.P. Marco Simoncelli.

            OfflineJarse

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              Re: N2 in tyres
              « Reply #5 on: 2013-06-05 01:02:09 »
              100% N2 would be better for your sensors IMO, as it is completely inert. Compare this to 12% oxidiser in normal air which might contribute to corrosion, (not to mention the moisture content of the air). N2 has any moisture removed before it's bottled.
              Nine out of five pilots are lysdexic!

              OfflineGargy

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                Re: N2 in tyres
                « Reply #6 on: 2013-06-05 21:30:20 »
                You will find it almost impossible to get all of the air out to make the tyre full of pure Nitrogen.


                No matter what you do, you will always have some air in the tyre before you attach a Nitrogen line.


                Unless of course you can fill it in a vacuum.


                As for the meaning of inert.............. Not readily reactive with other elements; forming few or no chemical compounds.[/font][/size] [/font][/size]

                [/font][/size]
                It will react with certain rubbers. I know this is true, as I have worked in a testing lab for the nuclear energy industry. They have a specific rig to test Nitrogen and it effects on certain rubber compounds. Certain rubber gaskets are banned from use on Nitrogen lines.[/font][/size]
                R.I.P. Marco Simoncelli.

                 

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